Pirate Party

 The Pirate Party starts up arund the world



26th August
2010
  

Update: Man Overboard!...

Pirate Party UK leader jumps ship

Pirate Party UK Andrew Robinson has resigned from his position as the leader of the UK's Pirate Party, slightly over a year since the party was founded and in the wake of relatively weak results in 2010's general election.

He made the announcement in a blog post listing the achievements of the party over the last year, including an invitation from OfCom to work with them on the implementation of the Digital Economy Act, and formation of a political party from what began as a subforum of Pirate Party International's messageboards.

The party stands for three main issues: significant reform of copyright and patent law including the legalisation of non-commercial filesharing, increased privacy and reduced surveillance from both the government and businesses, and a guarantee of free speech for everyone.

In a blog post, Robinson said: When the party started out we needed someone who was prepared to do everything that wasn't being done by someone else, and to be a peacemaker between different internal factions. Now we need a leader who can consolidate on the work we've done so far, and do a job that involves a lot more dealing with the media and talking to the membership on the forums, and a lot less time smoothing out internal management issues, designing adverts, sourcing suppliers and so on.

The party has now opened up nominations for the position on its messageboard.

 

 Update: Ice Pirates...

Lucky Iceland has the choice of a political party that isn't pro censorship and pro criminalising an enjoyable life


Link Here 4th May 2015  full story: Pirate Party...The Pirate Party starts up arund the world
Pirate PartyIceland's Pirate Party has managed to become the biggest political party in the country, after local polling showed public support in overwhelming numbers.

The Party, which has sprung up in over 60 countries, campaigns for internet and data freedom. It now has a 23.9% share of the vote, up from 12.8% in February.

By comparison the poll the country's ruling Independence Party had slipped from 25.5% to 23.4%.

Over the past month the party has seen its membership soar, according to recent polling, and would win 16 seats in Iceland's Parliament in the event of an election.

 


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